When Should Children Begin Toilet Training

When should toilet training start in children? We asked you some questions to make sure that your little one is ready for toilet training in terms of skills as well as age. Let’s see if your kid is ready to get rid of the diaper?

At what age does toilet training start?

The question of what is the most appropriate age for toilet training is one of the most curious subjects of mothers. The timing of toilet training depends on the child’s developmental ability and, of course, willingness. For many children, 1.5-3 years of age is the appropriate time for toilet training. However, children’s bladders are 20-21. ejaculates very often before months, so it is difficult to control. This may cause the training to take a little longer. That’s why some experts do not recommend 0-2 age toilet training. They recommend starting after 2 years of age.

On average; Girls get toilet training as of 29th month and boys from 31st month. Approximately 98% of children have completed toilet training by the age of 3. If toilet training is delayed, problems such as constipation or urinary retention may occur in your child. Despite normal development, toilet training given at the age of 4 and beyond is considered delayed.

What is the best time for toilet training?

The most important thing to consider when starting toilet training is to understand whether your child is ready to let go of the diaper. If your answers to the following 10 questions are mostly yes, you can start the exercises.

  1. Does the diaper stay dry for 1 or 2 hours a day? Does your child wake up dry sometimes, but not always, in the morning?
  2. Can you predict the stool time? Is there regularity in defecation—for example, after getting up every morning or just after breakfast? In the meantime, let me state right away; Regular defecation may not be very valid for every child. However, if your child is defecating regularly, this gives you an advantage in toilet training.
  3. How is your child’s increased attention to urine or stool? For example, does he go to a corner and crouch in a corner, try to raise his voice or change his facial expression when he is about to poop? Does he notice, signal, or indicate discomfort when urine flows between his legs?
  4. Can he understand and follow simple instructions? Can they express their needs?
  5. Does he/she know concepts such as dry-wet, dirty-clean, up-down?
  6. Does he know toilet-related terms like poop, pee, come to the toilet, butt?
  7. Does the diaper bother you? Does she want to wear underwear?
  8. Can he pull his pants and underwear down or up? Can she lift her skirt?
  9. Curious about the toilet habits of friends or other family members? Does he follow them to the toilet, follow them, wonder what they are doing, try to imitate them?
  10. Is it about staying clean and dry? Curious about being organized and tidy? Does he not want his diaper to stay wet, does he want his diaper changed?

Let’s talk about the situations that are not suitable for the question of when to accustom the child to the toilet. If;

  • If he has a new sibling,
  • If there has been a change in the home,
  • If there have been situations such as divorce or loss, you can wait for a while for your child to toilet training.

In short, “When is toilet training given?” Let’s answer the question. It may be more accurate to enter this process in the summer. Because in this way, the child can start education easily and without getting cold with less clothes.

How should children be toilet trained?

If you think your child is ready for toilet training, there are two more issues to consider now.

Are you ready for toilet training? You need to be as ready for toilet habit training as your child. Things may not go as you think; For example, your child may pee many times, you need to take him to the toilet frequently at night, he may be afraid of pooping on the potty.

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